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RECOVER NATURALLY WITH FOAM ROLLING

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Recover Naturally with Foam Rolling

RECOVER NATURALLY WITH FOAM ROLLING

Foam rolling explained by a Doctor of Physical Therapy.

CONTRIBUTOR: DANIEL GIORDANO, PT, DPT, CSCS
Over the past decade, researchers have provided many studies correlating prolonged sitting with shoulder, neck, and back pain.When you’re in pain, moving may be the last thing you would want to do. However, movement may be the best thing you can do. “Over the past decade, researchers have provided many studies correlating prolonged sitting with shoulder, neck, and back pain.1 Recent evidence suggests that prolonged sitting and inactivity can have other harmful consequences, such as increasing your risk for obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, musculoskeletal injuries and even depression.2 3 4 We are unsure why this is happening, but we believe it may be correlated to the lack of blood flow and circulation. “Physical activity may improve blood glucose control, which can ultimately prevent or even delay the onset of type 2 diabetes.5 For example, when we are not moving we may be negatively affecting glucose metabolism, increasing the risk for type 2 diabetes. When we sit for prolonged periods of time with poor ergonomics, it can also contribute to muscle tightness to shoulder, neck and/or back pain.

There are also studies showing that 5-minute walks throughout the day can improve mood and increase cognitive function, hence making you feel more productive.You’re probably asking, what is the easiest way to help these issues? Simply move! Movement will improve blood flow, improve circulation, and limit muscle tightness. “There are also studies showing that 5-minute walks throughout the day can improve mood and increase cognitive function,6 hence making you feel more productive.” If you can’t go outside for a walk or don’t have much room in your office, try using a foam roller to massage tight or sore muscles.

Not familiar with foam rolling? Foam rolling is a form of self-myofascial release, which is a self massage used to improve blood flow to the area.7 This practice may improve range of motion8 and cause a change in your nervous system.9

In order to foam roll properly, apply moderate pressure to the specific area you want to foam roll. If the direct pressure is too painful, you should shift the roller in order to decrease the amount of pressure on the roller. Once you get the correct amount of pressure, slowly roll your body over the desired area. Do not roll more than 1-2 inches per second. When you feel restrictions, pause for a second or two and move side to side in order to aid in pain relief. This self-myofascial release may facilitate blood flow, which can help improve muscular function/ performance and increase range of motion. The deep compression may also cause a change in your sympathetic nervous system and parasympathetic nervous system.10

As a warm up, foam rolling may be used to prep your body for movement (15-30 seconds per area) or for work, by facilitating blood flow to the area.As a warm up, foam rolling may be used to prep your body for movement (15-30 seconds per area) or for work, by facilitating blood flow to the area.” As a deeper and longer (60-90 seconds per area) self-myo-fascial release, foam rolling may be used as a cool down to up-regulate the parasympathetic nervous system, promoting relaxation and recovery.11

Below are a few ways which a foam roller may help improve blood flow and circulation, helping you decrease pain (naturally) and improve your mood while in your office.

Step 1, grab your Saje Extra Strength and apply it to the areas in which you may feel pain or tightness. The natural essential oils in Extra Strength were formulated in order to temporarily relieve pain and improve blood flow to the targeted area. The peppermint oil in the blend may also stimulate your nervous system, which will refresh your mood.

Step 2, grab your foam roller and get ready to move with these 6 moves.

man using foam rollerPhotos by Diego Lopez – @dilop3z

REFERENCE LIST

  1. Is prolonged sitting at work associated with the … – BMJ Open. Retrieved from https://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/6/11/e012689.Accessed 15 Oct. 2019.
  2. Prolonged sitting may increase diabetes risk in … – NCBI.” 4 Jan. 2017, Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28054097.Accessed 15 Oct. 2019.
  3. Occupational sitting time: employees? – CSIRO Publishing. Retrieved from https://www.publish.csiro.au/he/he11038.Accessed 15 Oct. 2019.
  4. Prolonged Leisure Time Spent Sitting in Relation to Cause ….” 26 Jun. 2018, Retrieved from https://academic.oup.com/aje/article/187/10/2151/5045572.Accessed 15 Oct. 2019.
  5. Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes – NCBI. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2992225/.Accessed 29 Oct. 2019.
  6. Effect of frequent interruptions of prolonged sitting on self ….” 3 Nov. 2016, Retrieved from https://ijbnpa.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12966-016-0437-z.Accessed 21 Oct. 2019.
  7. Acute Effects of Lateral Thigh Foam Rolling on Arterial … – NCBI. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27749733.Accessed 15 Oct. 2019.
  8. The effects of self‐myofascial release using …. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4637917/.Accessed 21 Oct. 2019.
  9. Effect of Self-myofascial Release on Reduction of … – NCBI.” 13 Nov. 2014, Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4242954/.Accessed 21 Oct. 2019.
  10. Effect of Self-myofascial Release on Reduction of … – NCBI.” 13 Nov. 2014, Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4242954/.Accessed 15 Oct. 2019.
  11. Effect of Self-myofascial Release on Reduction of … – NCBI.” 13 Nov. 2014, Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4242954/.Accessed 15 Oct. 2019.
Contributor

DANIEL GIORDANO, PT, DPT, CSCS
DOCTOR OF PHYSICAL THERAPY & CERTIFIED STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING SPECIALIST
Daniel Giordano, PT, DPT, CSCS is a Doctor of Physical Therapy & Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist. He is a graduate of New York University’s Doctor of Physical Therapy Program and the co-founder of the nationally recognized physical therapy clinic Bespoke Treatments, specializing in sports & orthopedic rehabilitation with an emphasis on manual therapy and strength & conditioning training. He is currently on the Advisory Board for Men’s Health Magazine and consults for numerous other recovery brands. During his career, Daniel has had the opportunity to work on the medical team for numerous events such as: USA Track & Field Olympic Trials, IAAF Track and Field World Championships, USA Track & Field National Championships, Nike EYBL Peach Jam, SLAM Summer Classic and Quicksilver Pro Surfing Championships. His focus is to advance patients in rehab with a smooth transition back to sport while educating to prevent future injuries.